Annie Mae Evans: Boston, Mass.

    Annie Mae Williams Evans of Boston, Mass., passed away March 27. She was 94.
    The daughter of the late Dolphus McCray Williams and Ella Day Ward, she was born in Tabor City on December 22, 1919, and graduated from Tabor City High School. She grew up on a tobacco farm in Clarendon, along with three siblings, and despite many hardships, her stories about her childhood were funny, and focused on how resourceful they all were.
    This optimism, and her energy and perseverance, were her greatest strengths. She realized many of her dreams through great hard work, and an amazing ability to connect with all kinds of people. She always tackled a challenge with enthusiasm, and turned it into a learning experience.
    During World War II she lived in Wilmington, and worked at Saunders Drug and the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad.
    She then moved to El Paso, Texas, and later to Dallas, where she lived for most of her working life. She loved Dallas, had a huge circle of friends, volunteered at the Dallas Theater Center, and ran her own business for almost 25 years. She sold women’s clothes, jewelry, and toiletries, and made many, many friends through her store.
    When she finally retired and moved back to Wilmington, she decorated her house, created a gorgeous yard, and joined a bridge group. She also volunteered at the Cape Fear Museum and the Fort Fisher Aquarium.
    She loved her family and friends, travel, and any occasion to get together with people.
    She is survived by her sister, Mary Lee Pritchard of Greenville, SC; her son, Jan Houston Floyd of Evergreen; her daughter, Wynelle Evans and her husband of Boston, Mass.; her granddaughters Vicki Sewell of Wilmington, Sandra Jordan of Loris, Becky Stewart of Raleigh and their husbands; seven great-grandchildren and a great-great grandson; many relatives and friends.
    Her brothers Miles Williams and John Kenneth Williams predeceased her.
    Her ashes will be buried in the family cemetery in Clarendon in a private ceremony in June.

Leave a Comment